×
all 23 comments

[–]gman2u 102 points103 points  (1 child)

Lol. My last field delivery was in a subway terminal and the baby came out so quick that the underwear cut the umbilical cord leaving mom bleeding on the floor and me clamping the 3cm stub with my fingers while trying to stimulate the baby to increase his apgar until my partner returned with the maternity bag. Mom and baby are doing well...

FYI... if you’re delivering a baby in the dark during a power outage during a snow storm...don’t give the future dad the flashlight during the birth! Every time she screams he’ll move the light to her face....lesson learned :)

[–]rustyirony 0 points1 point  (0 children)

too short; more details. Sounds like a fascinating story.

[–]Goonboo 32 points33 points  (3 children)

Wish I had stuff like this in my emt school. But that was like 11 years ago so I guess the times are changing.

This is nothing like delivering a real baby though. Where's the husband fainting. The firefighter puking in the corner.

And the slip and slide that is known as birth.

2/10 for realism.

[–]Captn_church 4 points5 points  (2 children)

I get to do this Wednesday, I'm not necessarily excited for the good when I do it on the job.

[–]Goonboo 6 points7 points  (1 child)

Well good luck with the career. Please take care of your mental health (I didnt, thus I can't go back to it anymore)

Best job I ever had and I wouldn't change anything for the life experience it taught me. But I wouldn't wish some of the shit i have dealt with on my worst enemy!

[–]Captn_church 0 points1 point  (0 children)

I guess that's just part of the job

[–]ShadyBassMan 34 points35 points  (3 children)

While those are great learning tools, NOTHING can train you well enough until you actually have to deliver a baby. So messy.

[–]endquire 6 points7 points  (2 children)

I was wondering if it prepares them for the goo.

[–]gamerholic 3 points4 points  (1 child)

goo = slime, blood and poop

[–]GoldenGonzo 31 points32 points  (2 children)

Thanks to this post, I now know how to safely deliver a baby. My wife is due in 2 weeks and we're going to save a ton of money by staying him and avoiding hospital bills. Thanks /r/WatchAndLearn!

[–]Just_Lurking2 2 points3 points  (1 child)

Top 7 Tips And Tricks For Homebirth

[–]superfluous2 1 point2 points  (0 children)

Doctors hate him!

[–]ShadyBassMan 5 points6 points  (0 children)

We actually have these mannequins for every imaginable complaint. I personally don’t like using them as I find it much easier to deal with patients than the bad voice acting of other paramedics/emts.

[–]IrishWilly 4 points5 points  (2 children)

I know this will probably come off as offensive to some, but I am really curious if there are any sort of physical fitness standards for being an EMT? If you are obese that has got to be very limiting. If you have a patient you need to move around and you can't do it, should you really be a field responder ?

[–]suagrupp 3 points4 points  (0 children)

I'm pretty sure you need to be able to lift 200lbs or something. Plus you're not going to pass every class in EMT school if you're too fat to physically be able to respond appropriately in emergencies.

[–]meatwagondriver6969 0 points1 point  (0 children)

Lifting, dragging or carrying 200lbs. We have (unfortunately) MANY overweight/obese medics and EMT’s where I work and the same holds true for a lot of EMS services. I know there are many differences in locations, but here, the fire department has stations and gym equipment for use in downtime (and a lot more of said downtime) whereas we are confined to our trucks and have boatloads of paperwork to do or are forced to eat fast food due to high call volume/system overload. It’s a tricky thing, EMS. Not to nag on FD, but it’s hard to stay fit in EMS.

[–]rinse_out 2 points3 points  (0 children)

I did some work in a place like this. We were installing cameras and Pis for a deep learning data capture to see if people were doing stuff correctly. But the place was fascinating, a bit like a TV studio. Apparently the technicians were constantly pranking each other too.

[–]Yellow54rva 1 point2 points  (0 children)

As someone who had a baby on her favorite (now ruined) living room floor rug with the help of an EMT I am grateful for training like this.

[–]lennybird 0 points1 point  (2 children)

That's pretty damn cool, but I kind of laugh at the "state-of-the-art control-room" comment, what with a bunch of LCD screens and Windows 7 Dell computers. Truly cutting-edge stuff ;-)

[–]SAT0725[S] 2 points3 points  (0 children)

The control room is actually wired to the sim lab. From the control room they're connected to all the robotic simulators, so they can talk through them, make them blink and breathe, start the birthing process, etc. all from the control room. Also they can record everything so they can later play it back.

[–]bv915 0 points1 point  (0 children)

I was thinking the same.

The community college I worked for in 2009 and the health science center in 2010 had this level of tech for its nursing programs. Literally all the same functionality.

Source: IT person who supported said tech.

[–]meatwagondriver6969 0 points1 point  (0 children)

I learned from a book and it wasn’t even close. My very first baby I delivered was stuck in Mom and squirted amniotic fluid everywhere when she pushed. She’s definitely not getting her deposit back on that apartment because the carpet is RUINED.